What’s the #1 Best-Selling College Financial Aid Book?

In 2021, my book LAUNCH hit #8 on Book Authority’s list of 51 Best-Selling College Financial Aid Books of All Time.

best-selling financial aid book

I was excited! But then I thought:

“OK—which book is the #1 best-selling college financial aid book of all time?”

I was overjoyed to see that the #1 best-selling college financial aid book of all time is Frank Bruni’s rockstar best-seller Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania.

I love this book because it echoes exactly what I say emphatically on my podcast here and in this article here. Gallup research shows that elite education does not actually lead to a happier life! Though I do recommend that everyone avoid for profit schools, students can attend lower-ranked colleges and still make their best, highest dreams come true.

Bruni’s book is a must-read not only for parents and students, but also for teachers and school counselors who sometimes inadvertently and unnecessarily pour gasoline on student anxiety by casually dropping this untrue sentence: “If you don’t get into a good school, you won’t be able to get a good job when you graduate.”

(This is not true! Frank Bruni explains why.)

Here’s the Amazon description for Book Authority‘s best-selling financial aid book of all time:

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11 Delicious Foods That Boost Brain and Memory

I love this Healthline article about 11 foods that boost brain and memory:

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/11-brain-foods

boost brain

Are you looking to especially boost brain power for academic work or standardized testing?

Read an additional article: What Should Students Eat Before Testing.

This help is kindly brought to you by me—the author of this book:

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No More SAT II Subject Tests! Whoo-hoo!

If you’ve got a copy of my book, you can happily cross out what it says about SAT II subject tests on page 80.

Whoo-hoo!

The College Board has announced it will no longer be providing SAT II subject tests.

No more SAT II subject tests! This is great news for students!

Why?

SAT II subject tests

Because in the past, many 12th graders found themselves lamenting, “What in the world? Some colleges I’m applying to want me to take an hour-long subject test in U.S. History, Chemistry, Physics, Spanish, or Literature? It’s been years since I had those classes! I’ve forgotten most of that stuff! Why didn’t anyone tell me about this sooner?”

This caused stress and consternation for students all over the country—but not for the students and parents who follow me.

Readers of my book were alerted to this—starting as early as 9th grade.

Students whose parents follow the clear steps in my book were tipped off, on page 80: “As soon as you finish a class on one of these subjects, whether you’re in 9th, 10th, or 11th grade, quick—go take the SAT II subject test on that subject. This might allow you to fulfill basic degree requirements, or get college credit for certain introductory-level courses. In some cases, strong SAT II subject test scores on a college application can help boost an applicant’s admissions ranking.”

Students who did this as early as 9th grade sidestepped senior year stress and pressure that ended up nailing the students who were surprised by this additional testing.

Would you like to be forewarned and fully informed about topics like these?

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Parenting Through the Pandemic

If you’re parenting through the pandemic, you’re doing something that hasn’t been done in this country in 100 years.

Nothing—nobody—has prepared you for this.

Let me give you a boost of encouragement.

You are doing better than you think. Give yourself a break. Cut yourself some slack. Lower your expectations.

As long as the kids are fed and safe—what you’re doing and how you’re managing this is good enough.

This quote about parenting through the pandemic says it well:

You’ll find even more encouragement about parenting through the pandemic in this article by Tara Haelle.

Here’s one of my favorite quotes from it:

“I think we maybe underestimate how severe the adversity is and that people may be experiencing a normal reaction to a pretty severe and ongoing, unfolding, cascading disaster. It’s important to recognize that it’s normal in a situation of great uncertainty and chronic stress to get exhausted and to feel ups and downs, to feel like you’re depleted or experience periods of burnout.”

“This is a once in a lifetime experience. It’s expecting a lot to think we’d be managing this really well.”

~Ann Masten, PhD, a psychologist and professor of child development at the University of Minnesota

Encourage yourself today—not by managing perfectly today—but by doing this.

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How Having Kids Helps Us in Chaotic, Uncertain Times

Having kids in the house keeps us looking toward the future. It constantly lifts our eyes to the horizon—to what will be years down the line.

In chaotic, uncertain times, this is good for us.

Especially when we say to ourselves, “I can’t control what’s going on in the world right now, but I can control my own behavior and choices. Right now, today, I can take some small manageable steps toward bright futures for the kids.”

I provide very short reading assignments that help with this—every week in my free weekly email newsletter.

Anyone can subscribe for free here.

Our country has been through frightening, chaotic times before, and we will go through them again. How great it is—to build our confidence that our kids are going to thrive and flourish in years to come—no matter what happens.

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