Will a Minimum Wage Job Cover Rent? Anywhere?

Some kids decide not to go to college after high school. This can work out greatif they opt for high quality job training instead of heading off to 4-year college. But what if your kid wants to work a minimum wage job in the years after high school? Is there any hope that he or she will move out of your house?

minimum wage job

A minimum wage job after high school puts kids at high risk for living in their parents’ basements.

Why is this?

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5 Ways to Keep Kids From Living Off You in Their 20s (AUDIO)

Most parents worry at least occasionally: “What if these kids don’t find good jobs and become independent adults? What if they want to lie around on my couch until they’re 30?”

debt-free college podcast

Join me, Jeannie Burlowski, for episode 6 of the Launch Your Teens podcast, and you’ll learn the one sentence that savvy parents cheerfully drop into casual conversation, here and there, during the years their kids are ages 12–26. It’ll make you laugh—and it’ll create a firm boundary that just might save you later.

(14 min.)

Prefer to read the content I talk about in this podcast? There are Jeannie Burlowski articles on this same subject here and here.

The show notes for this episode are below.

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Tee Your Kids Up For Career Success (In Just 2 Min.)

You desperately want your kids to succeed academically in school and in college so they can have a shot at lifetime career success—but cajoling and hovering and pushing them is just so exhausting.

Here’s fantastic help that will take you under two minutes to implement.

career success

According to world-renowned Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck (who’s done decades of high-level research on achievement and success), the difference between academic and career success and academic and career mediocrity boils down to whether the child has a fixed mindset or a growth mindset.

Carol Dweck describes the difference between these two mindsets this way:

“In a fixed mindset, people believe their basic qualities, like their intelligence or talent, are simply fixed traits. They spend their time documenting their intelligence or talent instead of developing them. They also believe that talent alone creates success—without effort. They’re wrong.

In a growth mindset, people believe that their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work—brains and talent are just the starting point. This view creates a love of learning and a resilience that is essential for great accomplishment. Virtually all great people have had these qualities.”

—Carol Dweck

This is fantastic in and of itself, but here’s even better news.

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Why and How to Stop Multitasking

Reclaim Your Productivity; Increase Enjoyment of Your Time Off

On the surface, it seems as though multitasking would be a great productivity tool. After all, if you can book a plane ticket and quickly shoot off an email while you’re on a phone meeting at work, why not? Haven’t you just masterfully killed two birds with one stone? Shouldn’t you be congratulated for being a brilliant time manager?

Research says no.

multitasking

Multitasking will drop your I.Q. faster than smoking pot.

One study showed that workers distracted by incoming email and text messages saw a whopping 10-point drop in their I.Q.s.

What’s the effect of a 10-point drop in I.Q.? It’s the same as losing an entire night’s sleep, and more than twice the effect of smoking marijuana.

Multitasking slashes your productivity by as much as 40%. 

We delude and fool ourselves into believing that we’re getting more done by multitasking. In reality, a day of multitasking results in less accomplishment, less productivity, and at the end of the day, something perhaps worse than mere low productivity.

Multitasking skyrockets feelings of stress and anxiety, eating away at the enjoyment of free time.

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The “Screenagers” Movie is a Must-See

Watch the Trailer Here—Find a Showing at the Link Below

Have you spent even one minute worrying about your kids’ use of screens? Physician and documentary filmmaker Delany Ruston sure has. She made the Screenagers movie after she found herself “constantly struggling with her own two kids about screen time.”

Screenagers

According to Ruston’s press release, she felt “guilty and confused, not sure what limits were best, especially around mobile phones, social media, gaming, and how to monitor online homework.” After hearing repeatedly how other parents were feeling just as overwhelmed as she was, she realized that kids’ use of screens is one of the biggest, most unexplored parenting issues of our time.

The good news? In her interview with a New York Times blogger, filmmaker Ruston says that, “Given the right guidelines, kids can increase self-control [over screens]. I was really surprised… kids consistently told me that they want rules around their screen time.”

Read the testimonials from teens and parents below.

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Is It True You “Can’t Look At Your Kids’ College Grades”?

You’re bleeding money to pay for your son’s college. You hope he’s attending class, studying for exams, and getting help when he’s stuck. But is he? Some people say that you can never know for sure, because, “parents aren’t allowed to look at their kids’ college grades.” Is this actually true, though?

college grades

Nope. It’s not true at all.

Oh, don’t get me wrong. It is true that because of FERPA laws enacted in 1974, colleges can’t show you — or tell you — any academic information about your child. But here’s what can happen. Your child can tell you himself. The college student you love can log you in and show you that he or she is OK.

“But what if my kid doesn’t want to show me his college grades?”

Here’s my suggestion. Wait until he asks you for money.

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When to Call the College’s Disability Services Office

Are you parenting a teen or a college student with a disability of any kind? If you are, you need to know about the wonderful services offered by the disability services office on your child’s college campus.

disability services

Whether your child has a physical disability, a learning disability, a mental health disability, or any other kind of disability, the college’s disability services office will provide extraordinary, kind, supportive help.

“When should we first contact the college disability services office?”

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College Debt Can Actually Hurt Academic Performance—Here’s Help

There’s no question about it—the ability to focus and concentrate for extended periods is absolutely critical to college academic performance.

The problem is—college debt can actually hurt focus and concentration.

debt affects academic performance

In this article by college student Ashley Bulchandani on dailytarheel.com, she tells adults exactly how she feels. “As a current college student, I am personally struggling with college debt and paying off my loans.” She worries that “debt accumulation can stress out students and lead to negative behaviors such as drinking, smoking, working a lot, and not focusing in class.” She points to research showing that “excessive college debt results in overall low academic performance in college and low graduate school attendance.”

The happy news is that parents can help. A lot.

1. Restrain your urge to push your child toward education that comes with a high debt burden.

Surprisingly, prestigious Gallup research concludes that expensive education does not lead to a happier life, more career success, or more money. See the exciting, liberating article I’ve written on this subject here. Or see me talking about this here.

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Half of Americans Regret Their Higher Ed Decisions?! Why?

The last thing you want is for your child to make a series of expensive higher ed decisions, and then regret them later. How can you help your kids to avoid making regrettable higher ed decisions?

An Epidemic of Regret

Regret over higher ed decisions has reached epidemic proportions in the US. According to a June 2017 report from Gallup and Strada Education Network, 51 percent of Americans would change at least one of their education decisions if they could. This is an astounding, alarming, high number.

1/3 of People Wish They’d Studied in a Different Field

More than 1/3 of people—36 percent of the report’s 89,492 respondents—would replace their field of study.

Most Shocking? How Many People Regret Their Liberal Arts Educations 

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Kids Ages 12–26 Need a COLLEGE STUDY SKILLS CLASS. Here’s Why

The college study skills class I teach is called THE STRATEGIC COLLEGE STUDENT. For more info on this class, scroll to the bold red writing below.

LIve class coming August 27th!

You already understand why college students and grad students need a high quality college study skills class. You can even see why it makes sense for high school students to take one. (Especially if they’ll be taking dual enrollment college classes in 11th and 12th grades.)

But why would I recommend that middle schoolers also take a college study skills class?

Something magical happens when a middle schooler takes a college study skills class. I’ve seen it a thousand times.

Here, 7 reasons why middle school (or as soon as possible after that) is a great time for your kid to take a college study skills class:

1. A class like this shapes the way the student sees herself and her future.

Middle schoolers tend to feel immensely flattered that someone—a parent, a teacher, or a middle school youth pastor—sees them as so intellectually capable that the topic of college is coming up already.

Oh, every student will initially object when an adult brings up the idea of a class like this—but once the student knows that attending is not negotiable, even a “low-to-average” achieving middle school student will secretly start to feel an internal glow of pride about it.

When middle school students attend a college study skills class, they begin to feel a subtle but distinct shift in how they view themselves and their future life. They start to see this line item being written into the overarching plan for their lives: “I’m going to college!”

2. Younger students eagerly devour this material.

After just about five minutes in my college study skills class, students are sitting straight up on the edges of their chairs, ears and eyes wide open.

The minute I finish explaining the importance of taking notes with pen and paper and not with computers, these students are taking page after page of detailed notes.

At the end of class—when I ask to see the notes they’ve taken and I marvel and exclaim over them, these students swell up with pride.

When I explain exactly how to review the notes later to lock in concepts in as little time as possible, they write down every word I say.

One 8th grade girl walked out of my college study skills class and told her mom: “Sorry, Mom—I can’t go get ice cream with you now. I’m doing a a systematic review method and I have to review these notes I just took.” And I wasn’t even giving her a grade for learning this material.

I find that middle school students are especially eager to listen, eager to take notes, eager to review, and eager to implement college study skills strategies after they’ve learned them. This presents an opportunity that is just too valuable for us to overlook.

Parents, if your kids balk at coming to this class when you first bring it up, pay them to attend if that’s what it takes. You’ll recoup the investment 100 times over later.

3. Every student loves it when I say these words:

“Some of you here today have never, ever worked up to your ability level in school. Some of you are the last people your teachers would ever think would go to college. Well, let me tell you something. Some of you sitting here today are going to surprise everyone. You know why? Because it’s not brains or genetic ability that make you good at college. It’s strategy and organization. Pure and simple. And anyone can learn that.”

4. Brain development research tells us that middle school is an ideal time for us to be talking about these things.

Middle schoolers’ brains are growing at an explosive rate—faster than at any time since infancy. Neural pathways are being pruned and strengthened, and so any experience they have during these years is likely to stick with them—in technicolor—for years and years afterward. Often for a lifetime. 

I want it to be during these years that they are first reached with the message of what it takes to succeed in college. 

If we are able to do this, the college success strategies we give them will be locked in in ways they will not be if we wait until just before or during college.

5. Students who learn college study skills early on do better in high school.

They get better grades in high school, they take and pass more CLEP tests, they succeed at higher levels in dual enrollment courses in 11th and 12th grades, and they tend to apply for and win more college scholarships between the ages of 13 and 26.

And after college is over? They’re the students who end up most likely to get their grad school paid for.

6. Students who take this path will walk onto their college campus with a 6-year track record of organizing their academics in ways that actually work.

When these students hear college friends talking about ridiculously ineffective college strategies like keeping track of due dates in their heads, or waiting until the last minute and cramming for exams, they’ll look at those friends like they’re completely out of their minds.

7. Students who learn high-level college study skills early on tend to feel greatly relieved of fear and pressure.

One bright, capable 8th grade boy recently wrote on my course evaluation for the college study skills class I teach: “This class has helped take away a lot of my fears about college.”

How much is that worth to a parent?

Whether your child is in middle school, high school, college, or grad school right now, don’t delay.

Sign up for my free weekly email newsletter now, and you’ll know the next time I’m teaching my 1/2 day  STRATEGIC COLLEGE STUDENT class either live or online.

Want a discount on this class?

My TRIBE Members get this class for free. Learn more about my TRIBE Membership and join the waiting list here.

Learn more about my 1/2 day STRATEGIC COLLEGE STUDENT class here.

You can see students ages 12–26 raving about this class here.

Get a quick preview of one of my most popular college study strategies here.

Your young adult child is finished with college, not ever attending college, and not headed to grad school?

Your young adult child will not need this class!

Instead, have him or her read this book: The Defining Decade: Why Your Twenties Matter—And How to Make the Most of Them Now by Dr. Meg Jay. It’s a life-changer!

Help us spread the word on this!

Copy this entire article and paste it right into your school, business, or nonprofit newsletter. Put a link to it in your Facebook group! Just include the words “By Jeannie Burlowski.”

And if you’ve found valuable info in this article, please help by tweeting it out to the people who follow you.

Imagine your kids not just performing well academically—but also getting through college debt-free.

There’s clear, step-by-step help on how to do this in my book:

It’s a reference book, so nobody reads the whole thing cover to cover. Pick out what you need to read in it using the fast-paced, 10-minute video instructions here.

You can see more than 100 reviews of it on Amazon at:

bit.ly/burlowski

(Tell your friends.)

You can see why financial advising professionals love LAUNCHhere.

You can see the top 9 questions parents are asking me about LAUNCHhere.

Read just one chapter of LAUNCH every 1–3 months while your child’s in middle school and high school, and you’ll know every viable strategy for debt-free college at exactly the right time to implement it.

And if your child’s already well past middle school? That’s OK; you can run to catch up. But the process of getting your kids through college debt-free goes more smoothly the earlier you start it—especially if you’re not planning to save up any money to pay for college.

Take a step on this right now. Get regular, inspiring help from me—every Monday morning.

Subscribe to my free weekly email newsletter here.

Do you have specific questions for me about debt-free college and career for your kids?

It’s my members that get most direct access to me. Doors to my membership open each year for just 5 days in March, and 5 days in September. It costs just pennies per day, but space is limited. Join the Waiting List here.

What about you? How old were you when you took your first college study skills class? Do you think you could have benefitted from taking it sooner? How so?

Comment below or LIKE Jeannie Burlowski Author on Facebook, find this post on that page, and let’s talk about it there.

Who is Jeannie Burlowski?

Jeannie is a full-time academic strategist, podcast host, and sought-after speaker for students ages 12–26 and their parents and grandparents. Her writing, speaking, and podcasting help parents set their kids up to graduate college debt-free and move directly into careers they excel at and love. Her work has been featured in publications such as The Huffington Post, USA Today, Parents Magazine, and US News and World Report, and on CBS News.

Jeannie also helps students apply to law, medical, business, and grad school at her website GetIntoMedSchool.com. You can follow her on Twitter @JBurlowski.

This article was originally posted on this blog on July 6th, 2017. It was updated on November 12th, 2020.