Parenting a Late Bloomer? Here’s Help.

Most of my time on this blog is spent helping parents get their teens and college students to careers they’ll love as quickly as possible. This makes sense—because years spent dragging feet in underemployment or treading water in undergrad can be expensive. But what if you’re parenting a late bloomer?

late bloomer

Here’s hope for your late bloomer.

What if you’re parenting a teen or 20-something who doesn’t yet seem motivated to take steps toward education, job training, or fulfilling career?

Today I’m discussing three specific factors that could be contributing to this.

The good news? All three are fixable.

1. Your late bloomer feels overwhelmed by the whole process of picking education and career.

Other kids are pushing frantically for Harvard and Stanford. Should she do that? What other alternatives are there? What if she makes an expensive mistake when it comes to school or job training? The many options can feel paralyzing.

Chapter 13 of my book provides clear instruction on how your family can pinpoint an exciting possible career goal for this late bloomer based on personality type, deep ongoing interests, and personal strengths.

Can’t afford the book? Ask for it at your local library. Go straight to chapter 13.

I urge you to ignore the lightweight, inaccurate, computerized “career assessments” given to your child at the high school. Instead, access a highly qualified career consultant on the “Approved Consultants” tab on this website. You’ll feel immediate relief.

Recently, one son said this about doing this career assessing with Cindy Mattson of definingpointconsulting.com: “I did not expect this experience to be this useful/important, but it ended up great—very helpful, and I am very happy we did it.”

2. Your late bloomer thinks that “30 is the new 20,” and that she has a whole decade she can kill doing nothing.

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