Your Med School Application—So Strong It Both Gets You In, And Gets You Money 

I wrote this article on creating a strong med school application at the request of the Harvard Crimson.

You’d love to put together a med school application so strong—that it both gets you in, and gets you money to help pay for med school.

Other students are accomplishing this—you can too.

Do you know the one specific principle that can take an average, dull med school application, and make it so outstanding—so riveting—that it inspires med schools not just to let you in, but to give you money to help pay for med school as well?

Building your application around this one specific principle works—even if you have lower grades and test scores.

Learn this one specific principle, and you can completely revolutionize the content of your med school application.

How do I know this?

Because I’m a professional academic strategist, and I’ve been helping students get into med school for 25 years at my website, getintomedschool.com.

Here, in a nutshell, is my best med school application advice.

In your main med school application essay, focus your efforts on constructing a flawlessly well-reasoned argument in your own behalf.

(I use the word “argument,” but of course I would never want you to sound argumentative. I want you to sound warm, and personal, and human—no question about that.)

In your med school application, think of yourself as a lawyer arguing the most important case of your career.

To do this effectively, you’ll need to know the three component parts of argument that lawyers use when arguing cases in court.

The three component parts of argument start with the letters E, A, and C.

Neglect just one of these three components, and your med school application will feel weak and unconvincing—no matter how many times you rewrite it.

Weave these three components together effectively, though—and you’ll have the med school admissions committee saying, “Wow. This makes absolutely perfect sense. I don’t even have a question about this. It’s totally clear to me that this person should be in medical school.”

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Scholarships? Easy Peasy—Starting In 8th Grade (Free Webinar)

This month I’m making applying for scholarships easier than ever.

Join me for a free webinar designed to whet your kid’s appetite for applying for scholarships.

In just one hour, you and your kids will hear me teach a short-cut, two-step strategy that helps students write one scholarship application essay and use it over and over again.

(In addition, you’ll learn a super clever way students can stand out as scholarship superstars—even if they have lower grades and test scores.)

This free webinar will only be presented on Saturday, July 25th, 2020.

It will not be recorded or replayed.

Reserve your spot in this free webinar here.

Remember, kids ages 12–26 and older can all apply for scholarships. Share this article with friends all across the U.S.—so they can attend with you!

scholarships easily

After the webinar—use these 3 great resources to increase your kids’ scholarship chances:

1. Skim this article—it points you to 1.5 million scholarships to apply for.

2. Skim this article as well—it gives you a genius way to motivate your kids to want to fill out scholarship applications.

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Applying for Scholarships During the Pandemic (ages 12–26)

Most of my writing and speaking is about getting kids through college debt-free without scholarships—but people have been asking me lately, “Would it be a good idea to apply for scholarships during the pandemic?”

Yes!

Here, 4 great resources for families applying for scholarships during the pandemic:

1. Skim this article—it points you to 1.5 million scholarships to apply for.

2. Skim this article as well—it gives you a genius way to motivate your kids to want to fill out scholarship applications.

scholarships during pandemic

3. Skim over this very popular article on how students can rake in college scholarships despite lower grades and test scores.

It’s encouraging!

4. Finally, take this 3-hour video class with your son or daughter (age 12–26): MAKE THEM SAY WOW: How to Write One Brilliant Scholarship Application Essay and Use it Over and Over Again.

In this 3-hour video class, I’ll teach you and your kids the fastest, most efficient way to fill out the greatest number of scholarship applications in the least possible amount of time.

[Video Class] MAKE THEM SAY “WOW!”

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Debt-Free College Training—Fast and Easy

Watch just one of the short, succinct video trainings below, and you’ll be on the fast track to getting the kids you love through college debt-free. 

debt-free college

If you’ve got a bright, capable middle schooler or high schooler headed for college—you’re probably wondering, “How are we going to pay for that?”

You’re especially thinking this if your kid isn’t a likely candidate for scholarships, you haven’t saved for college, and you make too much money to get government financial aid. (Or you think you do.)

You absolutely don’t want mountains of student loan debt for the kids you love.

Is there hope for getting your kids through college debt-free?

Yes.

But you’ll need someone to guide you.

Your journey toward debt-free college starts right here, right now.

Watch just one of the short videos below, and you’ll get a jump-start on getting the kids you love through college debt-free, and into jobs they love afterward.

Watch, and then share with the friends who’ll be with you on this journey.

(These fun, informal videos were made in the studio where I record my podcasts, but they are not technically podcast episodes. You can find Episode 1 of my podcast here.)

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In College? Do This and Slash Your Student Loan Debt

If you’re currently in college—or if you’re a parent who’s taken out dreaded Parent PLUS loans—you’d love for a hero in a red cape to swoop down and tell you how to slash your student loan debt.

The hero is here.

slash your student loan debt

1. Slash your student loan debt by applying for scholarships while you’re in college.

Oh—you thought that students could only apply for scholarships during high school?

It’s not true. Sorry—you’ve been given bad information that could cost you and whomever you marry massive amounts of unnecessary debt. Bad information that could compound your parents’ grief if you die unexpectedly.

Here’s the truth. Students can apply for scholarships while they’re in college, and while they’re in grad school.

2. Apply for 10 scholarships every single year during college and grad school.

Knocking out 10 scholarship applications each year is actually easy.

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12 Ways to Get Grad School Paid For

So, someone you love just got into grad school or medical school. That’s great! Now you’re wondering, “What can students do to get their grad school paid for?” Here are the 12 ways to get grad school paid for that I give to my clients at GetIntoMedSchool.com.

Share this article with a student whose financial future you care about!

get your grad school paid for

1. Try to become an employee of the school you got into.

Call 10 different numbers at the school you got into, and try to become an employee of that institution. Keep trying. Maybe you become a teaching assistant for an undergraduate course, or maybe you serve food, or maybe you work in the university’s daycare center, as my friend Susie did years ago at the University of Minnesota. One of your employee benefits may very likely be reduced tuition. Ask the school you got into if this is ever done. If you want to get your grad school paid for, this should be one of the first strategies you try.

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The Sweaty Truth About Sports Scholarships

Parents of athletes fork out thousands to cover sports expenses over the years. Many wonder, “Is all this time, effort, and money going to pay off big when this kid gets to college?” Here, the sweaty truth about sports scholarships.

truth about sports scholarships

1. The truth about sports scholarships: They can make it next to impossible to succeed academically. 

Student athletes are typically required to devote up to 40 hours per week to practices, travel, conditioning, and games. This article by NextStepU calls it “an unbelievable commitment in time and dedication…you may…be practicing at 6 a.m. or midnight or even twice a day.”

If your kid has an important test scheduled at the same time as travel back from a game, he’ll likely be told, “Too bad, you’re on a sports scholarship. Buck up and show that you’re all in on this sport.” Your daughter needs to study? She’ll likely hear, “Bring books and notes and study on the bus on the way.” Lack of quiet study space, pressure to repeatedly skip college classes, and sheer exhaustion from the schedule can wreak havoc with a student’s ability to focus on academics—the very reason he or she is at college in the first place.

Lynn O’Shaughnessy writes this, in Moneywatch:

Officially, D-I teams aren’t supposed to practice more than 20 hours a week though travel and other extra obligations aren’t included. In reality, the time restriction is often a joke. Conditioning or weight lifting, for instance, might be called voluntary, but the coach takes attendance and the kid who spends that time in the library could end up on the bench.

In the consulting work I do at GetIntoMedSchool.com, one of my clients explained his “B” in Organic Chemistry to me this way: “We flew home from a game, and I ran down the concourse and dove into the back of a taxi. I screamed at the driver to rush me to the building where my O Chem final was going on, but I was still 45 minutes late. The professor had no sympathy for my situation, and refused to give me any extra time. She said I should have made it a priority to be at the exam on time.”

2. The truth about sports scholarships: They’re not as lucrative as you think. 

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My Best Debt-Free College Interview Yet

Listen On Your Drive to Work Today

To listen to my best debt-free college interview yet, click here.

Listen while you’re driving or getting ready in the morning, and you just might change the life of a student you love.

free college

In March of 2018 I was interviewed by Andy Earle, a Loyola Marymount University researcher who focuses on parent-teen communication and teen thriving and flourishing. I’ve been interviewed many times since my book LAUNCH came out in 2017, but this interview is by far the best. It’s the best produced, the most in-depth, the most inspiring, and the most informative.

To listen to the entire interview, click here.

You’ll feel a growing sense of hope for the teens and 20-somethings you love.

I love what Andy Earle says about the debt-free college strategies I provide in LAUNCH.

After reading LAUNCH cover to cover, Andy says:

LAUNCH has become one of the most well-respected books on this subject (it’s the go-to reference book for financial planners and college consultants and coaches) because Jeannie isn’t just about doing college cheap, she’s about doing it debt-free and so effectively that it results in a great, satisfying career after college is over.”

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That Local State University May NOT Be Your Bargain Option

Many parents have only one strategy for lowering college costs. Send the kid to the local state university.

But is your local state university actually your bargain option—considering all the factors involved?

state university

The hidden costs of state university nobody talks about

At many state universities, it can take even the most diligent students six years to earn a four-year bachelor’s degree.

Why? Because classes are full, so students struggle to get into the classes they need to graduate.

A state university education can be like buying a plane ticket, walking down to the gate, and then not being allowed to board—over and over and over again—because the plane is overbooked and every seat is taken.

Two extra years in state university can end up costing your kid a staggering amount.

Read the article I wrote here on how two extra years in college can end up costing students $300,000 in extra tuition, interest, lost full-time income, and stunted retirement savings. Plus, of course, a huge number of students get discouraged before the six years are up, and drop out—leaving college with a boatload of student loan debt and no college degree.

Yikes.

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Want More College Money? Avoid These Costly FAFSA Mistakes

Fill Out FAFSA as Early as Possible For Best Results

If you’ll have one or more kids in college next fall—please plan to get your family first in line for financial aid money by filling out the FAFSA financial aid form as close to this coming October 1st as you possibly can. You read that right—11 months in advance. Are you tempted to skip filling out FAFSA because you assume you make too much to qualify for aid for college? Quick—right now—read my article 7 Reasons to Fill Out FAFSA Even If You’re Rich. Then use the instructions below to get every penny of the college money your kids have coming.

Tell everyone you know—avoid these common FAFSA mistakes.

Today I’m featuring a list of 30+ mistakes that parents make when filling out the FAFSA form. These mistakes cost U.S. families millions in lost college financial aid money each year.

To make sure your kids get every penny they have coming to them, download and print my list of common FAFSA mistakes here: 30+ Common FAFSA Mistakes and How to Avoid Them. (This link won’t open on some phones. If that happens to you, please open it on your desktop computer.)

Share this post with everyone you know who cares about kids who’ll be in college next year, and then have the printout handy on your desk when you’re filling out your own FAFSA form.

FAFSA mistakes

You’ll get instant answers to questions such as: 

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