Big News! Debt-Free College Help You LISTEN To!

For Parents of Kids Ages 12–26

Now there’s a faster, easier way to get debt-free college help!

Today I’m launching a podcast—where I’ll be helping parents of kids ages 12–26 set their kids up to graduate college completely debt-free, ready to jump directly into careers they excel at and love—even if they don’t get a single scholarship.

You can subscribe in the usual ways—or, for even greater impact, click here to watch me in my studio, recording the podcast most people only hear on audio.

Listen to just the first 8 minutes, and you’ll be hooked.

To learn why episode 1 of this podcast is so important for parents to listen to as early in the college journey as possible, read on.debt-free college podcast

As a parent, your greatest need isn’t for more information; your greatest need is for hope.

You need to be inspired that it’s absolutely possible for you to get your kids through college debt-free and into jobs they love afterward—without compromising one bit on your kids’ future dreams and potential.

And without taking up weeks of time you just don’t have.

You need to know that you’re following someone who’s capable of leading you.

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Help me Improve! Take My Brief Survey!

How would you feel if you could listen to my best debt-free college content—instead of just reading it? Your opinion matters to me!

Please help me serve you better by completing my brief survey, below. It takes less than 3 minutes, and your opinions will help me so much!

Take the survey here.

If you’ve not yet subscribed to my free weekly email newsletter, please do so now in the “Sign up for email updates” section of this website. Then—whitelist my emails using the directions I’ve posted here.

This is the very best way for me to give you free ongoing help!

Thank you so much for your help with this survey!

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Secret Weapon for Multiple Choice Tests

Which of these multiple choice testing strategies have you never heard of before? That’s your new secret weapon.

Share this article with a student you care about.

multiple choice

1. Before you start, note the structure of the test and plan your timing.

Here’s a nightmare you want to avoid. You turn to the final page of a test with two minutes left on the clock, only to find that the last question is a long-form essay question worth half the test points—and you’ve got zero time to write it.

If you know what’s coming, you can plan your time accordingly.

2. Read the question stem twice, then try to think of the answer yourself—without peeking at the choices.

The “stem” means the question itself, not including the answer choices.

Reading the question stem twice will help ensure that you won’t get answers wrong due to easily avoidable reading errors. And thinking up the correct answer in your head on your own—when possible—will help you instantly recognize the right answer when you see it.

3. Always read all the multiple choice answer choices.

Yes, the correct answer might jump right out at you, but carefully read the other choices as well. Sometimes you’ll realize that your original prediction actually needs to be reconsidered.

4. Don’t assume that the most familiar sounding answer choice is the right one.

Sometimes, the familiar sounding choice was planted there specifically to distract you from the right answer. When you’re choosing a correct answer, quietly ask yourself for some logical reasons why that answer is probably right.

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The Meme Every Kid Needs to See

Here it is—the meme every kid needs to see.

the meme every kid needs to see

Copy and forward this meme to the kids you love right now.

Tweet this meme out to the people who follow you!

When you’re a parent, it feels great to know you’re taking practical steps to set your kid up for successful college and career life.

For clear, step-by-step help getting your kids through college debt-free, get your copy of my book:

You can “Look Inside” the book on Amazon for free by going to:

bit.ly/burlowski

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Manage All Your Kids’ College Planning—Mostly By Yourself

If you’re concerned that you’re currently LATE to college planning, read this article now.

college planning

College planning can feel like being lost in a jungle. And sadly, your kid’s high school guidance counselor (nowadays more properly called a “school counselor,”) can’t help much with hacking through the underbrush. Oh, he or she would love to, but budget cuts have slashed the amount of time counselors get to spend with college bound students, in some cases down to just eight minutes per year.

And your child, smart as he is, isn’t in any position to handle the complexity of college planning either. The stakes are high, both financially and career wise, and his brain won’t be fully developed until age 24.

And the internet? You sure don’t want to depend on the internet for college planning advice.

Don’t rely on the internet for college planning advice.

It’ll take you years to sift through everything the internet has to say about college planning. The bits and pieces of info and conflicting messages you hear from online resources will drive you insane. Plus, a huge percentage of what’s currently on the internet regarding college planning is sorely out of date, since President Barack Obama drastically changed US college financing on September 13th, 2015, and most of the world has not yet caught up.

You need a resource that will give you fast, accurate, specific instructions that the internet can’t provide. (I’ll provide a resource for you, below.)

7 things to do when you feel lost in the jungle of college planning

1. Don’t put off college planning because you feel overwhelmed.

I understand that you feel overwhelmed by the college planning process. Every parent does. But if you wait until your kid’s sophomore or junior year of high school to get started on college planning, 75% of the strategies you could have used to get your kid through college debt-free will be gone. Starting early is the best strategy, even if you can’t save a penny.

(If you’re worried that you’re currently late to college planning, read this article now.)

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