These Top CEOs Went to College WHERE?

Your child feels a lot of pressure to “get into a good college.” Starting in 8th grade—or even earlier, he’s had the lie pounded into his head: “If you don’t get into a good college, you won’t be able to get a good job when you graduate.”

This lie can cause unnecessary anxiety for your kid and for your family. It can cause feelings of deep shame when a kid doesn’t get into his or her “dream school.” And, worst of all, it can lead students to drastically underestimate themselves and their future potential.

Let’s nip this lie in the bud, right now.

Take a look at where the current top 10 Fortune 500 CEOs went to college.

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How to Make Friends Before Arriving on Campus

It's Easier Than You Think

During high school, your teen didn’t have to think much about how to make friends. Friendships developed naturally out of middle school connections, and with any luck they flourished in the classrooms and activities that were regular parts of the high school experience. But after high school graduation, lifelong friends start to go separate ways. It’s at this point that your child (whether a quiet introvert or a people-focused extrovert) may start wondering—with some nervousness—about how to make friends at college.

Fortunately, technology can empower your kid to start forming on-campus social connections weeks before arriving on campus.

how to make friends

5 strategies for students wondering how to make friends on campus:

1. Connect with your roommate weeks before college starts. 

During the summer before dorm move-in day, the college housing office will usually provide you your future roommate’s name, phone number, and email address. Reach out, introduce yourself, find each other on social media, and start talking about your room. Who will bring the dorm refrigerator? Who will bring the microwave? Is one waste basket enough or do you need two? Get to know this person a little bit ahead of time, and you’ll lay foundation for what could end up being a lifelong friendship.

2. Connect with your future college community on social media. 

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A Special Note for My PERSONAL Friends and Family

We're About to Lose Touch, Unless You Can Do This

You and I are about to lose touch on Facebook.

In one main way.

personal

As of August 1st, 2018, Facebook is going to only very rarely show my Jeannie Burlowski debt-free college posts to my personal Facebook friends.

I’ve been posting these for you in hopes that I might be able to save your kids, your grandkids, or other young people you love $50,000 or more on college debt—and get those kids directly into jobs they love as early in their 20’s as possible.

I’ve been posting these articles for you—because of all the people in this whole world that I care about, it’s your kids and your grandkids I care about most.

To keep seeing the debt-free college and career articles I post, please do one of two things:

1. LIKE Jeannie Burlowski Author on Facebook.

This is my professional Facebook page. You probably haven’t “LIKED” it yet, because less than 14% of my personal friends and family have. (Which is totally OK.)

LIKE Jeannie Burlowski Author on Facebook right now, and you’ll continue to see my articles in your Facebook newsfeed.

2.  Sign up for my “email updates” at JeannieBurlowski.com.

It’s easy. Just look for this when you get there:

You’ll get a great article from me in your email inbox every Monday morning, plus you’ll get lots of other benefits my Facebook followers don’t get.

Be sure to whitelist me using the instructions here so my weekly newsletter goes straight to your primary email inbox and doesn’t accidentally get misdirected into a folder you never check.

My email subscribers never miss a thing.

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Can Community College Lead to a Master’s Degree?

You’ve heard that your local community college can save you thousands on college bills due to lower tuition costs. But could community college hurt your kid’s future career prospects? What if your daughter wants to get a master’s degree some day? Or a Ph.D.? Will having community college on her transcript hurt her chances of being admitted to grad school? To medical school?

community college

Here’s your answer. Nearly 20% of those who earned master’s degrees in 2016-2017 started out in community college. Fully 21.5% of doctoral-research degree earners in health and clinical sciences started out in community colleges just like the one down the street from your house.

These full-color graphs created by the NSC Research Center tell the story.

In my own work with law, medical, business, and grad school applicants at GetIntoMedSchool.com, I’ve never once seen community college hurt a student’s chances of being admitted to even very highly competitive grad school programs. One top 20 med school told me, “Oh, we are fine with students taking first year Biology and Chemistry in community college. A lot of times, they actually learn more there.”

Read on to learn how your child can get through community college at the lowest possible cost.

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Should You Pay Your Teen to Do Things?

You’re parenting a teen, and you’ve just had a fantastic idea for him or her. Something that could pay off in huge ways down the line. But your kid isn’t interested. “Nah,” he says, scrunching up his nose and shaking his head. “Not gonna do that.” Meanwhile, he’s playing video games for hours each day. What can you do to motivate your kid to read a book that will transform his 20’s, or fill out scholarship applications, or happily attend a one-morning college study skills class? Is it a good idea to pay your teen to do these things?

Is it wise to pay your teen to do things she refuses to do otherwise?

Yes, yes, YES.

Especially because you can do this while spending less money on your kid than you are right now. Try this entertaining strategy, one that other parents are using with great success.

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5 Ways Parents Head Off College Anxiety

This article is for you whether you’ve got a high schooler or a college student experiencing college anxiety.

When Samantha was in 10th grade, her Dad offered her a great suggestion. “Sam, why don’t we get your guidance counselor to sign you up for some college classes for next year, and you take those instead of regular high school classes? You can get real college credit for them, they’ll still count toward your high school graduation, and best of all, our state will pay for them!” Samantha hesitated, nervous apprehension squeezing at her stomach and working its way up to her chest and throat. It was her first experience with college anxiety. “I don’t know, Dad—couldn’t I just take a couple of AP classes instead?”

Don’t let your child retreat into AP classes to avoid college anxiety.

AP classes are the least dependable way to earn college credit in high school.

Contrary to popular belief, AP classes are not typically “easier than real college classes.” Think about it. Would you want to study a subject for months and months, and then have your success or failure depend on performing well on one big test at the end?

And then, after all that work, you find out that the college you’ll be attending may not even accept your hard-won AP credit?

That’s enough to exacerbate even the mildest case of college anxiety.

Here are 5 ways parents can head off college anxiety. (Number 5 is a big one.)

1. Emphasize that college success isn’t about how smart you are, it’s about how organized you are.

Your son is worried that he’s not smart enough for college. All kids are. If you went to college yourself, tell him that you really started being successful at college when you learned to use a calendar and make lists of tasks you had to do. Emphasize that organization is something anyone can learn.

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Dropping a Kid At College Feels Like a Train Wreck

High school graduation’s finally behind you, and you’ve got just three months (or less) until the day you’ll be dropping your kid at college. Part of you knows you should be getting a lifetime achievement award for making it this far, but instead, dropping a kid at college may feel like a train wreck in your own front yard.

dropping a kid at college

Blunt and raw, here are my own feelings about dropping a kid at college.

My own oldest son is heading off to college within weeks, and here’s what I said recently to my dear mom friends who are on the same railroad tracks as I am:

“It’s like riding a speeding freight train 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for 19 straight years. The train speeds up every year and goes faster and faster and faster AND FASTER until it becomes your life and your identity and your reality—and then SUDDENLY BAM! The train screeches to a halt and everyone you love flies off and runs away happy, and you’re left concussed and dazed and shell shocked and bruised by your seat belt—with only fragmentary memories of the journey.”

My friends laughed—and then they cried. They understood.

I love these words by Beverly Beckham on the subject of dropping a kid at college:

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The Most Important Furniture Item for College Students

What’s the most important furniture item for college students besides the dorm room bed? It’s not the dorm room desk (since quiet library study carrels tend to be far better for intense and focused studying than a dorm room will ever be.)

The most important furniture item for college students is a two-drawer filing cabinet. 

Here are 7 reasons why a two-drawer filing cabinet (along with a little instruction on how to use it) just might be the most important item your child takes along to college.

the most important furniture item for college students

1. A two-drawer filing cabinet reduces stress for students.

Without a filing system, your son will likely pile important papers on the right side of his desk. This works just fine for two weeks, until the pile becomes a massive avalanche risk and just finding a necessary paper document becomes an energy-draining ordeal.

2. There’s great power in being able to locate any necessary document in under 10 seconds.

Your daughter will greatly appreciate this when she needs to quickly locate a housing request form, or all the handwritten notes needed to study for a tough midterm.

3. Even in the 21st century, not everything’s electronic. Students still manage a massive amount of paper during college.

This is especially true for students who follow my advice and take class notes using pen and paper rather than electronic devices.

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Becoming a Veterinarian—is it a Sound Financial Decision?

Most of my articles are for parents of students age 12—26. This article is for parents, yes, but it’s also for any student thinking of becoming a veterinarian.

One of my clients at GetIntoMedSchool.com wrote me this week, asking my advice for a friend who’s thinking of becoming a veterinarian. My client wanted to know if I thought that right now, in 2018, vet school would be a good idea.

becoming a veterinarian

My thoughts on becoming a veterinarian might surprise you.

“My grave worry,” I told my client, “is that that vet school is so expensive—some veterinary students run up so much debt that they can’t repay it on a veterinarian’s salary. Anyone hoping to become a vet needs to use superstar strategies for doing it debt-free.”

Here are the steps to take.

Considering becoming a veterinarian? Do a quick salary study first.

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Moving Out of the Dorm? DormRoomMovers.com Saves the Day

Your child’s moving out of the dorm, heading off to another adventure for summer. What’s he going to do with all his stuff? You don’t want to drive the family minivan all the way there to pick it up. Especially because it’s not just clothes and school supplies. He’s got a mini-fridge and a microwave too. How can you take care of this in the easiest way possible?

Enter the dorm room moving superheroes, Dorm Room Movers.

Note that I have no affiliate agreement with this company. I’m giving you this information for free!

moving out of the dorm

Dorm Room Movers sends clean, new packing materials straight to your son or daughter’s dorm room, and then either ships them home—or, if you prefer, stores them for the summer—and then delivers them back the following fall.

Magic.

And if your child’s headed off to college for the first time this coming fall? 

Avoid paying airline baggage fees or hauling heavy boxes yourself. Save gas money. Reduce the need for your daughter to bring a car with her to college. Dorm Room Movers will send empty boxes to your house, and all you have to do is pack, print shipping labels, and schedule a pickup on the DormRoomMovers.com website.

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