About Jeannie Burlowski

Hi, I’m Jeannie Burlowski, and since 1988 I’ve made my living as a private consultant, working one-on-one with people from all over the country to put together individual outstanding applications to medical school.

Since completing my university training my background has included: teaching logical reasoning, verbal reasoning, writing, and deductive logic to college graduates preparing for the LSAT, the GMAT, the GRE, and the MCAT (on behalf of a major national test prep organization), presenting literally hundreds of admissions seminars on college and university campuses, and, since 1992, consulting full-time with individual applicants on how to make individual outstanding applications to medical school.

I began this application consulting work in early 1992 when my test preparation students started showing me their med school applications and asking for my input, especially on their personal statements. Many professors asked to do the same thing will simply respond to a student: “you missed a comma over here….” I though, as a logic teacher, would evaluate the soundness of the argument beneath the words. I would typically say: “What you’ve said here is: ‘I went on a two week mission trip to Haiti and fell in a sewer — therefore I should be a doctor.’ Is that what you meant to say?” (Obviously not.) I would then help them to probe the depths of their souls for what REALLY WERE the reasons they should be in medical school.

Word spread quickly that people I helped were getting into medical school in very high numbers, often after having applied numerous times before. More and more students started seeking me out for this kind of help, to the point that I realized I was going to have to make admissions consulting my full-time job.

I leased space for myself in a lovely colonial office building on a bus line very near the University of Minnesota and about four other private colleges, got some furniture and hung oil paintings on the walls, and the long-story-short of it is that I have kept a full schedule of application advising clients ever since. And repeatedly, at one particular very competitive medical school in my area, every one of the people I helped to apply was admitted — and at this particular school there are typically 1,680 applicants for 42 slots!

Applicants who consult with me find me to be compassionate and kind, and enthusiastically supportive in every way. If you need help of any kind with your medical school application, click on GET HELP NOW and find out how I can be available to you.

Note that  I provide this exact same service for applications to law, business, graduate, D. O., dental, veterinary, and Canadian medical schools.  So email, text, and twitter your friends!

Finally, tell your school’s pre-med society president that I can be available for a free, one  hour,  live,  in-person phone seminar for your pre-med group.  The session is entitled  “The Six Things You’ve  Probably Never Heard About Applying to Med School.”  Member students who can’t make the seminar can listen to a recording of it later on their phone, computer, or IPOD.  Call 612-622-2626 for more information.

“I’d been an alcoholic during my first three years of college, and even after 7 years of sobriety and a long string of straight A’s in postbac classes my GPA was still just a  miserable 2.9.  Other pre-med advisors told me:  ‘You’ll never get into med school with that GPA.  You might as well not even try.  Maybe you should think about becoming a nurse.’  Jeannie, though, said that if I never tried I’d wonder for the rest of my life whether I could have done it.  With her help I made a convincing case that I was highly academically capable despite that 2.9, and I got into a top 20 med school on the first try!  I went though in the top 5% of my class, and am an internal medicine doctor today.  Thanks for believing in me, Jeannie.”   –E.D., M.D., Minneapolis, MN

Note: Because application advisors cannot control your grades, your MCAT scores, your amount and quality of volunteer experience, or how thoroughly you follow the advice offered on these pages, please understand that we cannot guarantee any individual’s acceptance to medical school.

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